Washer/Dryer Table
Comments 6

New Washer/Dryer Table Completed

The goal for this update: complete the table top.

The goal for this update: complete the table top.

A woodworking miracle has happened! I completed the construction of this table project in just two weeks.

This washer/dryer table has been a project which helped me prove a point: I can make something quickly. I suspect that by the time my daughter’s window seat bookcase is finished, the better part of a year will have passed. And I am catching a slight amount of grief over this, so I wanted to really crank out this table quickly. Mission accomplished; but this project has been a lot of work. Especially over the last five days, almost every second of free time was spent in my workshop; and emergency runs to the home center for supplies and there was a football game to watch.

Here is a play-by-play recap of the week in my workshop…

CREATING THE TABLE TOP
In my last post on this project, I had completed the sides and work had begun on the top. The sides went together with super easy glue and pocket screws, and the molding clad panel for the sides was added with glue and brads. Nothing complicated here.

The top is only slightly complex, but still basic construction techniques were employed. I am using a hollow core door for the table top. Note in the illustration at the top of the post that the top has to span almost 60″ without any support. I eliminated birch plywood because I felt the need to use two layers of plywood to get the stiffness I wanted. This meant I would use the better part of a whole sheet of plywood, which is too heavy for the minimal structure of this table. The hollow core door is basically a light weight, wide box beam. And the structure within the door is minimal.

Turning a door into a table top.

Turning a door into a table top.

I cut the door down to size using my table saw and circular saw. I then cut strips to wood to fill in between the door faces.

A lot of thought went into my paint choice.

A lot of thought went into my paint choice.

Note in the photo above the addition of pine boards along the lower edge of the table top. This adds structure to the table top and gives me something to screw into when attaching the sides.

I was originally going to add a layer of counter top laminate to achieve a very durable work surface. But after shopping at two different home center stores, the $50.00 cost of laminate was a budget buster, especially when I would have a lot of it left over. So, I decided to simply paint the table top. I am good friends with the owner of my local Benjamin Moore paint dealer. After considering my options, I selected an exterior grade latex paint – pure white.

Adding oak banding to dress up the table top.

Adding oak banding to dress up the table top.

I then added strips of oak to the table edges to cover the layers of wood which make up the table top. The oak also will be a durable material for the table edges.

The completed table top.

The completed table top.

With the oak added and a little upright piece at the back, it was the opinion of my paint dealer that I could cover the whole surface with a couple of coats of water based polyurethane. And the result looks good.

JOINING THE TOP TO THE SIDES
The only remaining task was to paint the sides white and add the L-brackets which attach the sides to the top. I wanted to create a recess in the sides and top for the brackets and screws to fit into. I used my router and a template to accomplish this.

Template routing for L-brackets.

Template routing for L-brackets.

Transferring bracket locations to the top..

Transferring bracket locations to the top.

In the photo above, you can easily see the pine structure I added to the hollow core door. Again, the pine boards give me something to screw the L-brackets into.

THE RESULT
The washer/dryer table assembled and set up in my daughter’s apartment…

Small kitchen means a tight fit.

Small kitchen means a tight fit.

The red oak looks great.

The red oak looks great.

I am pleased with the frame and panel sides.

I am pleased with the frame and panel sides.

Over the last five days, I worked hard on this project, especially yesterday and today (I did take time off to see Alabama win the SEC Championship game last night ๐Ÿ™‚ ). The paint and polyurethane were just dry enough to handle and THE TABLE FIT! I was so worried that it wouldn’t. The washer and dryer hook-ups on the adjacent wall meant that the washer and dryer needed to sit deep into this corner of the kitchen with very little wiggle room.

This was a fun project and while parts of it were simple, there was a significant amount of engineering which went into it. I’ll have a follow-up post with some thoughts on the design and steps taken to ensure the fit was right. For now, I am going to take a few days off and get some Christmas shopping done.

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During the week, I sell carpet and rugs for The Dixie Group. Weekends, you'll find me in my basement workshop making furniture.

6 Comments

  1. Thank you for posting this tutorial! I always wanted to have this situation for my washer, dryer combo….my husband is a wonderful woodworker, I’ll pass this on! We’ve just been legating other “projects” around the house….but this one is a “must have”! Thank you!

  2. Ketchastar, thanks. I am going to do a follow-up post with some thoughts on how it was made and how I would make it differently if that ever happens. ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. Great use of a hollow core door. From the photos you would never know it wasn’t melamine. End cap looks good too. Good work. How long did it take to complete.

    • Mark, thank you. I walked the full length of my local Lowes store for more than an hour one Saturday, going over all the possibilities before picking the door. The construction, start to finish was two weeks. I spent about a week on design and template making prior to actual construction. Thanks for the comment. ๐Ÿ™‚

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