Power Tools, Window Seat Bookcase
Comments 6

Window Seat Bookcase: Milling More Stock

If I were to rate this project, I would give it an “advanced woodworker” rating if for no other reason than the various sizes components need to be. There are several parts which are 1 1/2″ thick like the legs, seat back, etc. The shelves are 7/8″ thick and the remaining parts are either 1 1/4″, 3/4″ or 3/8″ thick. The design of the window seat bookcase requires a lot of milling and stock preparation.

And it is time to mill some more stock. As is typical, my recent visit to the lumber store meant sorting through their stack of 2″ thick cherry to find the right board. I bought the least expensive piece they had – with sales tax: $72.00. I will use this significant board to form the perimeter of the bench top.

 What I am working on today: the perimeter of the seat.

What I am working on today: the perimeter of the seat.

In my last blog post, I got real philosophical about growing as a hand tool woodworker. I can’t imagine doing all this milling with hand tools. My miter saw, table saw, jointer and thickness planer were utilized in converting the 2″ thick plank into 1 1/2 thick by 2 1/8″ tall perimeter boards. Today, I was very content being a power tool woodworker.

My miter saw and stand handled this plank with ease.

My miter saw and stand handled this plank with ease.

After miter saw work.

After miter saw work.

After using my miter saw station to get the needed rough stock for the seat perimeter components, I’ll have some nice stock left over for the seat itself which will be about 1 1/4″ thick.

I then went back and forth between my table saw, jointer and planer to transform the cherry stock into nice cherry components.

My planer soaking up the sun.

My planer soaking up the sun.

Thinning some of the parts at the table saw.

Thinning some of the parts at the table saw.

As these parts got close to the final size, I checked their front to back thickness against the rear legs/seat back to make sure I didn’t take too much material off.

The seat back: final width and height.

The seat back: final width and height.

I still need to cut these parts to final length.

I still need to cut these parts to final length.

Today, I am happy to be a power tool woodworker because all the tools I mentioned were in a great mood and did what I needed to do with ease. Most importantly, I got virtually no tear-out which I have found cherry to be prone to do.

I’ll cut these parts to final length and then get to work on the seat itself. I will have to employ all the woodworking wisdom I have gained over the past 31 years to pull off this next step correctly.

The left and right perimeter of the seat which I am calling the arms need to fit flush with the sides. This means the seat itself will have to be cut with extreme care to get an exact fit. Ironically, I considered buying a shoulder plane today thinking it would be vital for success with this next step. But, I think I’ll use my router instead. Stay tuned. πŸ™‚

See my last blog post on this project for an overview of how the seat will come together.

* * * * *

Have a question or comment? Leave me a comment below; but I also like email. Use my contact form to send me an email (click here).

6 Comments

  1. I am loving watching your progress on this. I may not be inspired to take up woodworking myself, but i sure hope my kids do! This window seat is going to be gorgeous.

    • Thank you Alison. I am working hard to make this one of my best projects. We need more young people in woodworking. I hope you kids make it. πŸ™‚

  2. Doug Jenkins says

    Jeff, that really looks good. I can’t wait to get to meet you and maybe you will allow me to see your shop and work in process.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s