Window Seat Bookcase
Comments 14

Window Seat Bookcase: Shaping the Legs and Panel Glue-Up; a Quick Update

Curved work is something strange to me, mostly because I hardly ever do it. Some woodworkers specialize in artistic, sculptural woodwork; not me, I work in traditional shapes. Maybe too much so. A design goal with this project is to introduce more curves.

When it came time to add the curve to the upper area of the rear legs, I went at it not knowing what to expect. After rough cutting the curved shape on my bandsaw, I had planned to buy a spokeshave to fair the rough curve. I decided first to see if I could accomplish this task with my existing tools.

Initial rough cut off the bandsaw.

Initial rough cut off the bandsaw.

About half way finished smoothing the saw marks.

About half way finished smoothing the saw marks.

Smoothing about 95% complete.

Smoothing about 95% complete.

The second and third photos show a rasp. I bought it at Woodcraft thinking I needed something to help cut away the worst of the rough areas left by the bandsaw. Notice the abrupt end to the bandsaw cut (first photo). That had to be converted into a smooth transition to the straight part of the leg. The rasp did great and then my #4 bench plane did almost all of the remaining work. Very pleased how well this turned out. I also used a card scraper and sand paper, but these items saw minimal use.

The result was stupendous. Successful curved work, and it was easy. Look for more curves in future furniture designs. 🙂

Glue-Up Begins
To begin glue-up of the various sub-assemblies, the first task to complete are the small side panels. See this earlier photo…

Making final adjustments on panels for a good fit.

Making final adjustments on panels for a good fit.

This photo was taken in July of last year and the slender slats which make up the panels have never been glued together. Time to get that done.

Simple glue-up. Pine boards keep the clamps from denting the cherry.

Simple glue-up. Pine boards keep the clamps from denting the cherry.

Partially dis-assembled.

Partially dis-assembled.

Note the curve added to the rear legs.

Note the curve added to the rear legs.

In the last photo, you can see the material on the crest rail which will have to be removed. I hope to begin shaping the crest rail this week or next.

Currently, I have all the panels glued-up. I’ll need to do final sanding on these panels; there are eight of them and both sides will need to look good. I am thinking of shellac for a finish, which I’ve never used shellac before. Once I get finish applied to the panels, I can complete glue-up of the four leg and panel sub-assemblies.

This should be an interesting woodworking week.

* * * * *

Have a question or comment about this post? Leave me a comment below; but I also like email. Use my contact form to send me an email (click here).

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This entry was posted in: Window Seat Bookcase
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During the week, I sell carpet and rugs for The Dixie Group. Weekends, you'll find me in my basement workshop making furniture.

14 Comments

    • Hey Michael – I am thinking about using shellac. The reason being is what Glen Huey says at the end of this podcast. He says that he does not even tac cloth a project. Shellac sounds like a good finish for a sanded surface.

    • Thanks – it went surpisingly well. My #4 saw a lot of use, I used my little block plane on one leg and it worked well too. Lots of fun with that.

    • Thanks, as soon as the crest rail is completed, it should really look good. I have asked my daughter to begin thinking about what color she will want the cushion to be.

  1. Man that’s looking great! I was at Woodcraft the other day and I finally picked up some card scrapers. A friend that makes guitars has always touted them and I finally broke down. I do very much like them I just gotta get the sharpening down. Can’t wait to see this baby finished thanks Jeff!

    • Thanks – a card scraper is a great tool when sharpened. I have been having trouble getting mine sharp. It can be frustrating for sure, but a great tool.

      • Yea I have yet to master that. I saw a sharpening set at Woodcraft but it was like 65 bucks and I didn’t think it was worth it. It had a scraper, file, burnisher and a jig. After trying to get the proper edge I am starting to think I should have made that purchase. The next time they have a sale I may just look into that. I have seen videos where people just use a file, a piece of wood for the jig and a screw driver. I can’t get that to work just yet.

      • The card scraper can be a real mystery. Todd Clippinger has a super easy method that I can’t seem to reproduce and Mike Pekovitch has a somewhat complex method I don’t have all the tools for.

  2. I really like it. the back rest/rail would work well to protect a person from leaning against the glass window.

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