Tool Cabinet and Surround
Comments 10

A Quick Update on the Tool Cabinet

No woodworking on my workbench.

No woodworking on my workbench.

Here my table saw is functioning as just a table.

Here my table saw is functioning as just a table.

I just thought it would be interesting to show you guys what my workshop looks like when I don’t build anything for a couple of weeks. Sort of funny to me.

I work from home. This is common among manufacturing sales representatives in the flooring industry. A nice benefit of this is that when others have to contend with terrible traffic as they drive into work, I simply walk upstairs to my home office which is a great and wonderful thing.

But there is a downside to working from home: all of my samples and sales material are shipped here. I represent four product lines and each one has a lot of different products. I need to have samples of most all of these and in some cases more than one sample. These samples share space in my basement, and they are starting to take over my woodworking area. It’s a battle to keep things organized which implies that there are moments when my samples actually are organized. This never happens.

Something that makes me smile – there have been times when I’m in a flooring store showing a carpet or rug sample and I have to wipe away saw dust. But, do you guys have a hard time keeping stuff from stacking up on your table saw or workbench?

On to my tool cabinet: I am in the process of building out the inside of the tool cabinet (see what it will look like here). In my last post, I completed the framing for the bottom three drawers. What I am showing below is more of the same process…

Saw kerfs to the bottom of the web frames so I can better bend the warp out of them.

Saw kerfs to the bottom of the web frames so I can better bend the warp out of them.

Pockets for screws along the front edge.

Pockets for screws along the front edge.

Note the blue tape helping me locate spacer blocks (carpet samples in the background).

Note the blue tape helping me locate spacer blocks (carpet samples in the background).

Adding a slender board along the back which helps stiffen the web frames.

Adding a slender board along the back which helps stiffen the webframes.

View of the back showing interior structure.

View of the back showing interior structure.

And the front showing all the luscious cherry.

And the front showing all the luscious cherry.

Most of the tool cabinet’s interior is complete. I will still need to add some blocking under the web frames to keep the middle drawers (those not using metal slides) from tipping down as I pull them out and something to help define the depth of these drawers. I have not decided exactly how deep I want the drawers to be.

Next up – I’ll complete the drawer framing by working on the small drawers in the upper area of the cabinet and then I’ll tackle building 11 drawers.

Now, a photo today of my table saw; some new carpet samples arrived yesterday afternoon and nowhere to put them (some rockin’ carpet tile).

These will be quickly taken to a commercial dealer for an upcoming church renovation (also a carpet sample in the background).

These will be quickly taken to a commercial dealer for an upcoming church renovation (also a carpet sample in the background).

The space battle continues… I’ll have another update soon.

10 Comments

  1. Chuck says

    It’s amazing to me that you are able to manage your time the way you do; especially under those circumstances.
    Chuck

  2. Any horizontal surface is an invitation to put stuff there. It’s nearly a daily battle to keep my work surfaces clear and useful. I think even most woodworkers with a 100% dedicated workspaces still suffer from cluttered workbenches.

    The tool box is looking real good. And so are those samples 🙂

    • I know you are right about clutter. I keep thinking I need to build shelving along the back wall of my basement. Lots of wood needed for that and $$$. Maybe some day I’ll do it. 😀

  3. I find absence makes the clutter grow deeper. If I’m in my shop regularly, things stay under control, but after a recent 4 month hiatus (while I did a client kitchen install and then gutted, re-framed, re-plumbed and re-wired my own basement) the shop turned into storage unit. This was aggravated by having to move stuff out the basement for the gut. It took me two days to get the place back in working order so I could start working on built-ins for the basement reno. And I’m lucky enough to have a shop that’s at least 2/3 dedicated to that purpose (one vehicle sometimes manages to sneak into a bay.) If I shared it with living space, it would be a disaster.

    So good on you for managing as well as you do.

  4. I am a part-time potter and woodworker. Both my pottery studio and woodworking shop turn into clutter when I am prepping for an art festival. Thank goodness I only do a few per year. Like caldeobald, if I am not using the spaces actively, the clutter can build quickly. When I was full time in construction management, it was much worse.
    Nice looking tool cabinet. All the best with your project and clean up.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s