Author: Jeff Branch

Rolling Tool Cabinet Woodworking Plan

Today, I am publishing my 19th woodworking plan. Titled You Can Build a Rolling Tool Cabinet, this 21 page plan covers the construction steps needed to build a 12 drawer tool cabinet with an open area where larger tools can be stored. This plan is based on the tool cabinet I used in my workshop for almost 30 years. The tool cabinet which is made from sheets of plywood contains basic joinery methods like screws and glue, brads and glue and a few pocket screws. See the slide show video below for a quick view of the plan… The tool cabinet with casters measures 52-1/4″ tall, 33″ wide and 19-3/4″ deep. The drawers roll on 18″ ball bearing drawer slides and as the title indicates, the cabinet rolls on casters which makes it easy to move your tool cabinet closer to your work area. At 21 pages, this is more than just some elevations of the cabinet and a cut list. In addition to elevations and a cut list, there are four pages of material …

Three Bench Jigs

Editor’s note: Happy New Year! I hope all of you are as excited about a new year of woodworking projects as I am. And I have some pretty major projects in the pipeline. More about them later. ne day, while deep into building my new workbench, I saw a truly excellent video where Mike Pekovich discusses the merits and use of his favorite workbench jigs. As I neared completion of my workbench, this video kept reappearing in my mind and I knew I had to adopt several of Mike’s jigs for my workbench (his video shows six different jigs). All of them are just stupid easy to make. I like designing my own projects, but sometimes I’ll see something so good, I’ll simply duplicate it. At the end of his video, Mike mentions the Fine Woodworking magazine article which featured these jigs in more detail (viewing the article requires a FWW membership). After viewing the video several times and printing the article from FWW’s website, I went to my workshop and made three of the …

Shop Upgrade: The Jet AFS-1000B

I have known for years that fine sawdust is detrimental to my health. At a meeting of the Alabama Woodworkers Guild, a guest speaker who is knowledgeable about such things made this sobering comment: extra fine sawdust can be breathed into your lungs and can be so fine, that it never gets expelled from your body. You would think that would be enough to cause me to upgrade my dust collection equipment, but it wasn’t until something my wife recently read that was the kicker. While reading on her iPad, she said, “This article says that sawdust can cause cancer.” Me: “Yea, I think I have heard that before.” Somehow, my wife telling me this was more shocking; like a little woodworking secret had been revealed and I had to do something about it (read more about the ill effects of sawdust here and here). After the Guild meeting mentioned above, I looked into making my own filtration system like other woodworkers have. A typical design includes a narrow plywood box with spacers for a …