All posts filed under: Alabama Woodworker’s Guild

Montreat Side Table Part 8: Making Panels

I had this odd feeling as I began the next step for bringing my Montreat Side Table design to life. After adding some distinctive design elements to the table (see this post), I returned to some very basic woodworking. I began breaking down and milling stock to make panels. These panels will become the bottom and middle shelf as well as the top of the table. Excitement builds as a project begins to take shape. And that is what has been happening as I added the walnut slats to the sides and back. Now, it seems that forming these needed panels isn’t so exciting. But then that is the challenge: Find an exciting, even creative side to this next step; a step which could be considered among the most mundane of woodworking tasks. Let’s take a look at the next step in construction… As shown above, I will next make the items highlighted in blue the largest of which is the table top measuring 24-1/2″ deep by 28-1/2″ long. I created a material cutting diagram …

Final Design for the Top of my Moravian Workbench

ith the base of my Moravian style workbench completed, it’s time to turn my attention to the top. The design of my workbench has changed only slightly since I first shared my vision for a new bench on June 1, 2014. This early design doesn’t really portray a split top; rather a top with two slabs of wood joined in the middle with no gap like the current design (above – the tool cabinet design continues to evolve and will likely change even more after the top is finished). Before buying lumber, I needed to finalize the design of the top. My biggest concern has been the true size of the front vise; specifically, is it too big? After some considerable study, several months ago I purchased a large, 10″ Eclipse quick release vise from my local Woodcraft store. I never gave serious consideration to a leg vise like a true Moravian bench would have. As you will see in a photo below, I have a narrow traffic area in front of my current workbench; …

Building The Scott Meek Wave Grip Jointer Kit, Part 2

This is an interesting project because the construction process has me doing some things I don’t normally do. Case in point is the wedge for the jointer plane. This part is the second component in this project which I have been stressing about. My thinking is that for the wedge to properly hold the plane iron in place, it has to be perfectly shaped in thickness. If while forming the wedge, let’s say the left side is a little thicker than the right edge, the plane iron probably won’t stay in that perfect spot while in use. The perfect spot is where a tissue thin ribbon of full width wood is effortlessly removed from some wood (like at the end of this video). But, one thing I have going for me is Scott Meek’s Popular Woodworking video in which Scott explains in great detail his process for making wooden body hand planes; things to look out for and what to do if something doesn’t go just right. I had been watching this video on an …