All posts filed under: Crown Molding

My custom crown molding project is finished!

I just walked into our home office to sit down at the computer; straight from the dining room where I have been renovating the ceiling there. A project that began on February 18, 2011 and even though the paint is still wet, I’m calling this one finished! Why do I have to tackle such large projects? At least they are large for me, a weekend woodworker. I have not worked on my dining room ceiling continuously since early 2011. It came to a stop for six months while I built a queen size bed. I also launched two woodworking plans (here and here) during that time and I did some extensive writing on SketchUp. But it has been a long project none the less. Even though other things derailed my ceiling reno, it was always going to be a slow-moving project; ceiling work is simply no fun. I think most projects which involve the frequent use of a ladder should be automatically categorized as no fun. Even though I did get a little enjoyment from …

Crown molding: fabrication begins

In this photo: outdoor woodworking. Routing MDF is such a dusty endeavor, that I do it in the driveway. Medium density fiberboard is the material I chose to create my dining room crown molding. The chief attribute of MDF which made it a winner in my mind is that it is a flat material. When stacking molding profiles one on top of the other, being flat and straight is critical. But, the chief attribute that makes it a looser in my nose and my sinuses is MDF is a highly dust prone material. I can’t ever remember doing such extensive routing of MDF. Since I had worked with it repeatedly on my table saw, I knew MDF created a lot of dust. But after routing a profile on twelve, eight foot long boards, the large amount of dust beginning to pile up on my driveway was starting to drift in the wind. I decided to form the profile of my custom crown molding in my driveway, because I knew the dust cloud resulting from indoor …

Scott bookcase: the crown molding

I agonize over certain steps of my projects. Most of the Scott bookcase is pretty straight forward woodworking – cutting dados for cross pieces, routing a few profiles for molding, yadda, yadda, yadda. But, when it comes to crown molding, I get a little stressed, and it is not unusual for me to get big-time stressed during the actual attaching of the crown. I mean, the crown molding has to be cut exactly for it to fit properly. Adding to the complexity of crown molding is a wonderful (I am kidding) new idea of attaching it to the bookcase. See the drawing below… Topping it off. Note the piece of wood that fits flush with the top edge of the molding. I thought this would be a good way to attach the crown and finish off the top. The problem is that just like the crown molding, this piece of wood has to fit perfectly. Three sides of this board have to be cut at a 38 degree angle. I can cut this along the …