All posts filed under: Dave Richards

Dave Richards’ Method For Using SketchUp Materials

Once upon a time, I shared an image of a SketchUp model on Google+ which generated a question from a reader: “I like how you style your models; how do you do it?” My reply: “I simply look for realistic materials and apply them to components as best I can.” Making good use of materials in SketchUp is an advanced skill. I have learned a thing or two about this from some of the best woodworking SketchUp users around – Dave Richards and Tim Killen who write at Fine Woodworking.com’s blog “Design. Click. Build”. Recently, Dave added a video tutorial covering his method for adding realistic wood materials and I highly recommend that you bookmark this web page for future reference (see it here.). In his video, Dave provides a simple and detailed approach for making this advanced technique much easier to accomplish. I recommend you play the video back a time or two, then open SketchUp and follow along with Dave. There are many steps in the video which I simply did not know …

Creating a Complex Crest Rail in SketchUp

When I published a post about the second design for my daughter’s new bookcase, I got an interesting comment from Dennis. Among other things, Dennis suggested I add a subtle curve to the top of the crest rail to soften the look of the bookcase. I liked this idea and started the process of adding another curve to my SketchUp model. But making this modification to my model was a lot more difficult than I had planned. While I know the process needed to remove three curved planes from a square SketchUp component, after repeated attempts, I had a crest rail with multiple errors. Since I want to know how to correctly accomplish this process, I called on Dave Richards, a SketchUp master who writes at Fine Woodworking.com and has published an exceptional instructional DVD on SketchUp. I emailed Dave my model and naturally, he had a different and simplified way to create the crest rail. Below is what Dave taught me along with some steps of mine to break the crest rail into three …

What Will My Next Project Look Like?

I was catching up with an old friend one day when the subject turned to woodworking. He says, “What kind of things do you build?” I could have answered this question a few different ways. But, I talked about all various kinds of furniture I have built over the years with most of the work being case pieces. Later, I wondered if he meant what style I tend to work in; for example, early American reproduction furniture? This question would have been harder to answer. I do like historic American furniture, but what I really like is furniture which has a sense of architecture. This is why some of my designs feature a heavy cornice, or recessed panels. Within the world of architecture, I most like the work of Andrea Palladio. I like the order and symmetry of his work. While I have been influenced by Shaker furniture and even primitive American furniture, what I am most influenced by today is classic, orderly architecture. I say all of this because it is very possible I …