All posts filed under: Design

Designing the Modern Kitchen Cupboard

I am in the early stages of a new woodworking plan. I continue to explore easy ways to make durable, stylish furniture which does not rely on pocket screws for primary joinery. I don’t mind using pocket screws, in fact my last woodworking plan calls for 26 pocket screws to be used during construction. I just think that there is more gained by learning to use as much wood-to-wood joinery as possible. Past woodworking plans feature dado and dowel joinery. With the right jigs, these two joinery methods are easy to execute, but a truly successful dowel joint relies on precise placement of a dowel jig. With the upcoming woodworking plan, I am going to include mortise and tenon joinery in place of dowels. With the use of a chisel and/or hand plane, a tenon can be made to perfectly fit a mortise. In my future woodworking projects, I’ll be using mortise and tenon joints in place of dowels. Rustic furniture is still trendy. I recently saw in the pages of Architectural Digest, a fashionable …

A Bible Stand for my Mom

One benefit of being a woodworker is the woodworker can design and build furniture to fit any space. In my mom’s home there exists a small corner in her foyer. Not long after graduating from the University of Alabama where I had taken a shop class titled “Wood Technology” I built a slender bible stand to fill that space. This was about 1985. I was greatly influenced then by woodworker Peter Kramer. A few years ago, I wrote a blog post about Peter which shows photos of his furniture designs (see the blog post by clicking here) The bible stand is a variation of one I saw in the 1984 issue of Country Home magazine, which I still have. When I am having design trouble, I’ll often open the pages of this magazine and read the article about Peter. I was at my mom’s house last night and took these photos with my iPhone. The bible stand will soon be 30 years old and is still looking good – no need of any repairs. This …

A handsome corner cupboard

A few weeks ago I visited some relatives in Spartanburg, South Carolina and had the good fortune to see this handsome corner cupboard. I was taking a break from work, football games and the Tornado Bed and seeing this cupboard was timely. You see, I had just experienced frustration with my bed project: I had been drilling holes and fitting dowels through some pegged mortise and tenon joints. During this process, some tear-out developed around the holes, which I was hoping to avoid. If you are not familiar with tear-out, see some examples in the cupboard photos below (click to enlarge)… I am very much a perfectionist in my woodworking. Even though I don’t build the most challenging furniture, the projects I do build, I want them to be pretty much perfect. This includes a nice, clean hole for a pegged joint. But this very handsome cupboard has some tear-out, so is there a lesson here for me? Should I get so torn up about tear-out? My uncle who owns this piece wondered if it …