All posts filed under: Dining room crown molding

Crown molding: racing towards completion

Can you see some progress? I have completed another row of molding. Putting this project on a fast track has been the goal of late. I announced to my wife that I was going to add shop time to my early morning schedule (prior to work) in an effort to really move this project forward. I have been able to do this many mornings recently. This is in addition to time dedicated in the evenings when I can. You would have to be a very close follower of this project to notice the difference as shown in the photo above. All of the hard work since my last post does not translate into an equally noticeable visual impact, especially since this project is hard to photograph well. I have been working on the third row of molding shown in yellow below… The areas highlighted in green have been completed. The yellow section is my current task. The first step was to mill some more molding, so I had to get the router out and create …

Crown molding – taking shape

The crown molding is starting to look like something. Here I have the first layer completed. Note how it wraps around the pilasters. If I were to pick a word that describes how I view this project currently, it would be “optimistic”. As I have said before, this project is onerous at best, although the view as seen in the photo above motivates me much more. When I first contemplated what best would do for crown molding in the home of a woodworker, stock crown was quickly eliminated. And while I did ponder the use of multiple pieces of stock crown to achieve a custom look, that idea quickly became boring to me. But then, the idea of totally custom crown was born. No big deal, I’ll just copy the design of one of my favorite pieces of furniture, a majestic thing that maybe someday I’ll be fortunate enough to build (see it here). I knew in the back of my head replicating that cornice molding would be a chore. It is one thing to …

Crown molding: fabrication begins

In this photo: outdoor woodworking. Routing MDF is such a dusty endeavor, that I do it in the driveway. Medium density fiberboard is the material I chose to create my dining room crown molding. The chief attribute of MDF which made it a winner in my mind is that it is a flat material. When stacking molding profiles one on top of the other, being flat and straight is critical. But, the chief attribute that makes it a looser in my nose and my sinuses is MDF is a highly dust prone material. I can’t ever remember doing such extensive routing of MDF. Since I had worked with it repeatedly on my table saw, I knew MDF created a lot of dust. But after routing a profile on twelve, eight foot long boards, the large amount of dust beginning to pile up on my driveway was starting to drift in the wind. I decided to form the profile of my custom crown molding in my driveway, because I knew the dust cloud resulting from indoor …