All posts filed under: Hand Tools

I Build the Hock Tools Shoulder Plane

At this point in my hand plane collection, I am willing to try building a hand plane. I currently have a Lie Nielsen #4 bench plane, a Lie Nielsen #60R rabbeting block plane and a Veritas low angle jointer plane. A while back, I bought David Finck’s book, Making & Mastering Wood Planes, and even after reading this book, which devotes 192 pages to every aspect of making and using wood hand planes, I still felt intimidated at the thought of building one. When contemplating a fun gift for my recent 55th birthday, I told my wife I wanted a Hock Tools Shoulder Plane Kit. My thinking was building a kit will help ease me into the world of making hand planes – not that I envision making a lot of wooden body hand planes. I don’t, but maybe a couple or three; we will see. The photo at the top of the post shows the kit with all the parts. A benefit of plane building from a kit is that the folks at Hock …

Shooting with the Veritas Bevel-Up Jointer Plane

Santa brought me a Veritas bevel-up jointer plane this past Christmas. I was sooo impressed that he has an account with Lee Valley. Don’t ever under-estimate how well-connected Santa is; I suspect he has an account with all the best plane makers. 🙂 While doing research on which plane to put on my Christmas wish list, my final options were the Veritas bevel-up jointer and the Lie-Nielsen #7 jointer. Both manufacturers are highly regarded – I would easily buy from either company; but there is a significant price difference between the two planes. The Lie-Nielsen costs about $125 more when compared to the Veritas equivalent outfitted with their premium PMV11 blade. So, to me the decision to get the Veritas bevel-up jointer was pretty simple. But I did see one negative review of the Veritas plane. The poor critique centered on the fact that the Veritas jointer is not suitable for shooting end-grain. Since I don’t ever plan on shooting end-grain, this was not an issue for me, but I did wonder why Veritas designed …

A Photo Prop for my Daughter

My daughter Beth is a food writer. She got the food writing itch when she was a sophomore at the University of Alabama and developed an interest in baked goods, specifically, desserts. She launched her first blog and named it the Collegiate Baker. The idea was to document learning to bake using the somewhat run-down appliances that came with her dorm and later, her off-campus apartment. Upon graduation, she had to leave the college theme behind and started her current blog, Bethcakes. One of the important skills when writing a food blog is styling photos. Beth learned that along with a luscious recipe, she needed equally luscious photos of the things she baked. Props are very important when styling photos – plates, silverware, etc. A key prop is the table on which her photos are taken. Natural light is very desirable when snapping photos of tasty treats, so basically she has to use the kitchen table since it sits adjacent to a large bay window. The kitchen table is a dark stained oak, basic stuff; …