All posts filed under: Peter Kramer

A Bible Stand for my Mom

One benefit of being a woodworker is the woodworker can design and build furniture to fit any space. In my mom’s home there exists a small corner in her foyer. Not long after graduating from the University of Alabama where I had taken a shop class titled “Wood Technology” I built a slender bible stand to fill that space. This was about 1985. I was greatly influenced then by woodworker Peter Kramer. A few years ago, I wrote a blog post about Peter which shows photos of his furniture designs (see the blog post by clicking here) The bible stand is a variation of one I saw in the 1984 issue of Country Home magazine, which I still have. When I am having design trouble, I’ll often open the pages of this magazine and read the article about Peter. I was at my mom’s house last night and took these photos with my iPhone. The bible stand will soon be 30 years old and is still looking good – no need of any repairs. This …

About those finials

While building the Tornado Bed, a few people asked about the finial design. I had seen this design used in a bed more than 25 years ago and had always liked it. I also had planned to write about it in an earlier post, but forgot to do so; something I’d like to correct now. The original design is by woodworker and furniture designer Peter Kramer (no relation to Cosmo). Back in the 1980s when country decorating was sadly so popular, Country Home magazine did a write-up about Peter Kramer’s unique home as well as an additional article about his design style for furniture. I count him as a key person in my development as a woodworker. I still have that magazine and thumb through its pages from time to time to get my creative juices flowing. Peter’s finial design was part of a head board that featured some slight carving and a painted detail. See the photo below (click the photos to enlarge)… Since making this bed, I have had some time to look …

Peter Kramer cabinet maker

It’s interesting how things impact certain aspects of your life. Twenty-six years ago my wife and I received the March/April 1984 issue of Country Home magazine (pictured above with a price tag of $2.50). I was going through a primitive furniture phase in my woodworking and the country decorating craze was trendy. I would look through the pages of magazines for inspiration for furniture design. This issue in particular had a sizable impact on me. It is funny to think back on how much I liked the beat up look of primitive furniture and some particularly worn antiques. There was also a furniture line available at the time in which they took great effort to make their new pieces look old; something that is still common today. I would repeatedly walk through a local furniture store and look at the “worn” new pieces from this line (no doubt the store owner wondered why I kept coming back to her store). This magazine featured the work of a particular furniture maker who did not reproduce antiques, …