All posts filed under: Scott bookcase

Reader Email: the Scott Bookcase in Oak

I get reader email from time to time. Most are questions concerning a woodworking plan, or the lack of a woodworking plan. For example, I have been asked more than once to make plans for either my router table or the miter saw stand I use. But, the Scott Bookcase woodworking plan was the subject of the most recent email. Jeffrey T. asked this question… I have been looking at many of the designs on your website. I have recently had a house built, and I would like to build the Scott bookcase for my office. My office sits just off to the right of the entryway to the house. The entryway is an open 2-story foyer with oak steps and railing. The stairway borders the office, so the first 4-5 feet of my office wall is the staircase, so it is an open floor plan. We stained all of this ourselves with English Walnut stain (med. oak finish). I cannot find a bookcase that I like, so I want to build this one. I …

Scott bookcase: moving day

On the move. The bookcase in transit to it’s new home. The big day for the Scott bookcase has arrived – moving day. This project started sometime around the middle of January and it has been a fun three month project. This is my first project where I have utilized Google SketchUp during the design process and this project has helped me refine my process for building case pieces. Crisp. The color is pure white – no tint at all. It really is fitting for a traditional piece like this. The post project critique. As is the case with all of my projects, I write my own critique of what went well and what I need to improve upon. On the plus side: This is about my fifth bookcase and I am getting better and faster making them (you can find photos of two others here and here). My last two bookcases have been painted and I used many of the same techniques on the Scott bookcase as I did with my daughter’s bookcase. Due …

Scott bookcase: Primer and paint

Adding the finish. After final sanding, I begin applying primer to the bookcase. One of these days, I’ll have a knock down spray booth for my shop. This is a goal7 because applying primer and paint by brush is a lot of work. It is funny though, a premium paint job completed by a professional painter will often include a final brush on coat of paint so the finish will have a hand made look to it. I have found through this project that spraying on a finish is the preferable way to go. Getting an even coat of thick primer with as few brush marks as possible is difficult. In addition, as you can see in the photo above, to eliminate runs, I am applying primer only on horizontal surfaces (note the lower section laying on its back on the work bench). The process is to apply primer, allow it to dry, sand it with light to moderate pressure, and then apply a second coat of primer followed with a light sanding. This process …