All posts filed under: Scott bookcase

Scott bookcase: the crown molding

I agonize over certain steps of my projects. Most of the Scott bookcase is pretty straight forward woodworking – cutting dados for cross pieces, routing a few profiles for molding, yadda, yadda, yadda. But, when it comes to crown molding, I get a little stressed, and it is not unusual for me to get big-time stressed during the actual attaching of the crown. I mean, the crown molding has to be cut exactly for it to fit properly. Adding to the complexity of crown molding is a wonderful (I am kidding) new idea of attaching it to the bookcase. See the drawing below… Topping it off. Note the piece of wood that fits flush with the top edge of the molding. I thought this would be a good way to attach the crown and finish off the top. The problem is that just like the crown molding, this piece of wood has to fit perfectly. Three sides of this board have to be cut at a 38 degree angle. I can cut this along the …

Scott bookcase: adding the waist molding

I have made some big progress in the last few days on the bookcase project. While I had the parts for the face frame cut last weekend, I did not start to assemble them until Wednesday. By Friday, I had the face frame assembled, attached and trimmed. Then it was on to some sanding and applying the moldings to the simulated side panels. Most recently, I was able to fabricate and apply the waist molding and size the three shelves of the upper bookcase… Cutting a cove. The waist molding is made from both a custom milled piece and stock stop molding. Here I am routing a cove on a three inch wide piece of poplar. My new workbench is perfect for this. Warped. The custom milled piece of poplar had warped since I brought it home. So, here I have attached it with screws that will be hidden. I use three from the front and two from the back of the face frame to pull it straight. The profile. Here is a shot of …

Scott bookcase: more work on the top – fabricating the back

How nice should the back be? I like solid backs on big pieces of painted cabinet work that will hold a lot of heavy items like books. This adds a lot of rigidity to the piece. But, some woodworkers put much more effort towards dressing up the back of their pieces. With this project, I am making a conscious effort to improve the look of the back. You may wonder why I would do this since the back of this project will not be visible. It really comes down to craftsmanship. Some woodworkers actually put just as much effort to making the back look good as they do the front and sides. Note the photos below… A gorgeous back. This open hutch by Ronald Layport features a beautifully detailed back made of tiger maple. Layport’s project appeared in Fine Woodworking #89, August 1991. If it’s expected. With fine pieces like Layport’s and this Arts and Crafts writing desk by Stephen Lamont, you would almost expect the back to be nice. This photo is from the …