All posts filed under: SketchUp

Changes for SketchUp Pro 2019

hortly after SketchUp announced their updates for SketchUp Pro 2019, I began thinking about the impact to the woodworking community. Then a few emails arrived from readers and I talked to others about the 2019 update. One thing is clear: SketchUp Pro is increasingly useful only for professionals. The weekend woodworker who happens to like creating furniture designs in SketchUp Pro will find the 2019 pricing plan hard to justify over the long run. Is SketchUp Pro 2019 Viable for Weekend Woodworkers? First, SketchUp has become a suite of products. Long time users will remember that the free version of SketchUp provided much of what a woodworker needed in a desktop 3D modeling solution. The only other option was the Pro version which added solid tools, (among other features) for SketchUp Pro and included two additional programs; a documentation product called Layout and a way to add illustrative looks to your model via Style Builder. There is a saying that all good things come to an end, which isn’t always true, but it is with …

Designing Furniture in SketchUp #2

Every now and then, I get an email asking for a SketchUp model to be made to match a photo or a change to one of my woodworking plans. I’ve received two such requests recently. Because these projects can be very, very time intensive, I now only do this on a commission basis, meaning I get paid for the work. Some of these design projects can be challenging. I’m not only replicating a photo, more importantly I’m determining the best construction methods. Take the dining table shown above. I got an email and a photo which asked for a SketchUp model. I stated my rate which was agreed to and the work began. The photo showed a table which was slightly larger than what the client wanted for his own home. So, the first challenge was presented: how to scale down the table without losing the original look. I think the end result was successful, especially the view of the side. The view from the end, is a little suspect because the side to side …

The Gustave Side Table – Making Page 22

I have said virtually nothing here about my next woodworking plan which is titled You Can Make the Gustave Side Table. This table is designed in what I call “Craftsman Lite” and the plan name is derived from Gustav Stickley’s first name. Mr. Stickley is best known as a chief force behind the American Craftsman movement of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. According to Wikipedia, Stickley’s business name in 1898 was Gustave Stickley Company. Since this spelling of his first name was unusual, I decided to use it for this plan. While preparing for this woodworking plan, I came to the decision that attempting multiple illustrations at a high level (trying to be more like what is seen in woodworking magazines) simply isn’t necessary. And, in a way such illustrations can be confusing; all the color and lines – I have come to realize that simple is best. But, even creating simple images can be a little complex. In fact, for You Can Make the Gustave Side Table, I have created more than 130 …