All posts filed under: Workshop

Bandsaw Renovation, Part 1

f my bandsaw were a human being, I’d owe him an apology. My bandsaw is a tool which I have frowned on for many years. I have a drill press which I call Elvis because it shakes, rattles and rolls like no other tool I own. While my bandsaw isn’t as offensive as Elvis, it still shakes and has been a disappointing purchase. For some, the bandsaw is the center of their power tool universe; the most versatile power tool in their workshop. My table saw gets this honor while my bandsaw receives the ultimate put down. It stands in a remote area of my workshop and collects dust, or rather the sawdust from the other tools I regularly use. But, whenever I contemplate using this tool, there is always this thought: I need to work on it; give it a tune-up. But my bandsaw is a tool which doesn’t make sense to me. I once saw a blog post where the woodworker viewed his bandsaw in much the same way and a tune up …

Three Bench Jigs

Editor’s note: Happy New Year! I hope all of you are as excited about a new year of woodworking projects as I am. And I have some pretty major projects in the pipeline. More about them later. ne day, while deep into building my new workbench, I saw a truly excellent video where Mike Pekovich discusses the merits and use of his favorite workbench jigs. As I neared completion of my workbench, this video kept reappearing in my mind and I knew I had to adopt several of Mike’s jigs for my workbench (his video shows six different jigs). All of them are just stupid easy to make. I like designing my own projects, but sometimes I’ll see something so good, I’ll simply duplicate it. At the end of his video, Mike mentions the Fine Woodworking magazine article which featured these jigs in more detail (viewing the article requires a FWW membership). After viewing the video several times and printing the article from FWW’s website, I went to my workshop and made three of the …

Shop Upgrade: The Jet AFS-1000B

I have known for years that fine sawdust is detrimental to my health. At a meeting of the Alabama Woodworkers Guild, a guest speaker who is knowledgeable about such things made this sobering comment: extra fine sawdust can be breathed into your lungs and can be so fine, that it never gets expelled from your body. You would think that would be enough to cause me to upgrade my dust collection equipment, but it wasn’t until something my wife recently read that was the kicker. While reading on her iPad, she said, “This article says that sawdust can cause cancer.” Me: “Yea, I think I have heard that before.” Somehow, my wife telling me this was more shocking; like a little woodworking secret had been revealed and I had to do something about it (read more about the ill effects of sawdust here and here). After the Guild meeting mentioned above, I looked into making my own filtration system like other woodworkers have. A typical design includes a narrow plywood box with spacers for a …