All posts tagged: Home Improvement

Workshop Wall Surround, Part 6: Adding the Crown Molding

Which is correct – molding or moulding? This question has bothered me for quite some time. I have seen prominent woodworkers who write for magazines spell it this way: “moulding”. But recently, when shopping at the Home Depot, I noticed this word displayed on an overhead sign: “molding”. I’m going with molding. If it is good enough for the Home Depot, it is good enough for me. In my last post, I completed the base molding for my workshop wall surround (see an illustration of it here). Time now to turn my attention to the crown molding. The design I had been mulling over in my head is shown above. The space I need to fill is seven inches tall and I want the molding to be tall, but I don’t want it to extend outward very far. To accomplish this, I selected a small crown molding which would be attached to two 3/4 inch thick boards. I envision these two boards having a molding profile at their bottom edge which would add some visual …

Workshop Wall Surround, A Quick Update

After cleaning out my dust collector last weekend and being confined to a hotel room for much of this week, things have been quiet around here lately. Today, I was able to get back into my workshop and make some progress on my workshop wall surround. The goal with this phase of the project is to hide my hideous furnace and water heater from view. I am getting close. The wall, made of four removable panels, is starting to look like it should. All that is left to do is add the base moldings and some sort of crown molding. Note the baseboard blocking at the bottom of the wall in the photo above; pretty ugly looking, but that is about to change. The base moldings were pretty simple to add; the base is composed of two pieces of wood – a wide strip of birch plywood topped with a handsome pine base cap molding. The only tricky aspect of this step was getting a tight fit on the 22.5 degree corners. There is a …

Workshop Wall Surround, Part 4

This project has meant dealing with a lot of sheet goods. For many woodworkers, breaking down sheet goods on the table saw is a challenging affair; even dangerous without the assistance of a shop helper. So far, I have been working with quarter-inch thick plywood. Even though this thin material does not weigh much, ripping wide sections of eight foot long material is a little tricky. Unsupported thin plywood will sag and in general, it will be uncooperative. Now I am working with much heavier and more difficult 3/4 inch thick plywood. Just as I did with the quarter-inch plywood, I take advantage of the panel saw at my home center and have the 3/4 stock ripped in half – easy to transport and easier to make additional cuts in my workshop. Since I want to use my table saw for additional rips on these 2 x 8 foot plywood panels, I am somewhat concerned about sending this size stock through my table saw. To help support the long and still somewhat heavy stock while …