All posts tagged: workbench

My New Workbench is Finished

I have been woodworking for almost 35 years. And I guess it is an accomplishment to have so many years of woodworking behind me; all the mistakes, successes and such. But even though I am becoming a woodworking old-timer, there are so many new things I have been trying that in many ways I am a newbie. For example, after finishing all of the construction steps needed to complete my workbench I had to take it apart (see the photo at the top of this post) and make the all important decision about what protective finish is appropriate for this bench. After much consideration, I went with three different finishes, each one being something I had never worked with before. The bench top got a coat of boiled linseed oil. The leg assembly was treated with several coats of wax and the oak components (front and rear stretchers, gap stop and wedges) were fumed with ammonia and then got one coat of garnet shellac. Never before worked with BLO, same for waxed bare wood and …

Moravian Workbench: Installing The Second Vise

ust as I began the installation of the second vise for my new workbench (an end vise), I saw a blog post by Richard Maguire saying that you don’t need a second vise. In fact the title of his post, “Why Your Workbench Needs One Vice (Or Less)” implies that you can get away with no vise at all. And I recently pointed to a video by Mike Siemsen where he shows several ways to use a workbench without a vise. But, If that isn’t enough, I have heard Fine Woodworking authors Mike Pekovich and Matt Kenney talk about how they dislike end vises. Specifically, they don’t like pinching stock (heard on Shop Talk Live). Pinching stock is when you place a board between a bench dog and an end vise and clamp it in place. All of these woodworkers do great work, all of them teach woodworking, so they are people whom I listen to and respect. Now then, I know something about having a workbench with no vise at all. For many years, I …

Moravian Workbench: Leg Assembly Is Complete

It has been a long, long time since I last reported on the progress with my Moravian workbench. I have been taking my time cutting the four different leg joints to ensure I get them right (or reasonably close to right). My methods have relied heavily on power tools for the bulk of fabrication and then gaining a tight tenon fit using hand tools. Warning: this is a long blog post with a lot of photos. Let’s dive in by reviewing the various leg joinery… As far as I can remember, I have never made a through mortise and tenon joint. This joint is difficult to make well because the fit between the tenon and mortise can be easily seen. Making a nice, tight, square mortise and then duplicating that same shape on the mating tenon is time-consuming and even a little stressful. After having made the dovetail joint at the base of the leg (something I did twice before I was happy with the result), I made the angled mortise which will ultimately house …